The fierce battle for the floor

\ "lucha-turno-palabra".

Has this ever happened to you?

 

You are listening to a conversation and you understand what is being talked about. :mrgreen:

Little by little, and thanks to the key words and the fact that you know not to listen to what is of no interest to you,  😉 you understand what the conversation is about and you think what to say, you want to participate and give your opinionYou are even willing to refute these arguments.

You search for the words in your head and you know that, in order to speak in a Spanish conversation, you have to interrupt (otherwise, you'll be listening forever 😆 ).

        \Come on, now," you say to yourself.

And suddenly... they change the topic of conversation.

😯 

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TURNS OF SPEECH IN REAL CONVERSATIONS

As we told you in this entryIn conversational Spanish, turns of speech do not occur one after the other, in an orderly fashion, with everyone speaking more or less the same thing. In informal conversations, people struggle to talk; generally, if you don't make an effort to talk, you don't talk 🙂  

A strategy we often use is interrupting several times without finishing cutting the other person off (as if to say "hello, I want to talk"), and on the second or third (or fourth) time, you definitively cut off the conversation and state what you want to say/ask. 

You can listen to an example in the following conversation.

Four people participate: two women and two men. Note the turns to speak:

  • Who, when and how much you talk.
  • How the woman interrupts the other woman until she gets to speak.

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CHANGING THE SUBJECT...

Unfortunately, we rarely say "Changing the subject..." to actually start talking about something else, or propose to talk about something else. 🙂 🙂 

In conversational Spanish, unlike in the audios of the manuals, several topics are usually covered in the same conversation.. Sometimes, we change the subject constantly, especially if the relationship between people is close. 

Ideally, you should learn to understand when we change the subject so that you can better follow a real conversation and participate in it. There are several tags or markers indicating that we want to (and are going to) change the subjectby the way; oh, by the way; uh; hey; and; well....

Listen to the audio again,

 

and pay attention to the end of the conversation:

  • How does the woman change her conversation? What words does she use?

* TRACKIt is a very common expression. 

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In the transcript you can see the solution to these questions. We also suggest that you locate the key words to understand the overall message and be able to follow the conversation, as well as the "noises" that are not interesting to hear/understandas we proposed in the previous entry.

And in the next entries we will keep giving you tips for learning to understand conversational Spanish betterThe one that is spoken in the street, the one that your friends speak, the one that people communicate with in stores...

And, hey, by the way, 😛 what is it. your experience with turn-taking in Spanish conversationsAre you or have you been easy or difficult to participate in a real conversation?

Feel free to share your experience in the comments (below) - we'd love to read about it! 🙂 

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